• El mundo es distinto ahora, pero los errores son los de siempre - Daniel Cantos Pardo
  • Era el primer viaje que realizaban sin tutor y saboreaban la libertad que con esa excitación que produce todo lo nuevo - Pablo Gonz
  • La falta de créditos retardó en tres años la partida de una verdadera expedición solarista - Stanislav Lem
  • El futuro ya está aquí, sólo que desigualmente repartido - W. Gibson
  • Me sentí como un punk que hubiera salido a comprar una navaja automática y volviera a casa con una pequeña bomba de neutrones - W. Gibson
  • A la mañana siguiente, realizaron su primer anochecer estelar - Diane Duane
  • —¿Un sol azul? —dijo Karellen, no muchas horas más tarde—. La identificación no puede ser muy difícil - Arthur C. Clarke
  • Aun así, en ese brillante interior había un núcleo oscuro, un indicio de algo encapsulado - Alastair Reynolds
  • El cielo sobre el puerto tenía el color de una pantalla de televisor sintonizado en un canal muerto - W. Gibson
  • Hace frío señor, en este campo —dijo el señor Tagomi—. Podemos regresar al centro de la ciudad en el helicóptero de la Misión, ¿le parece correcto? - Philip K. Dik
  • ¿Que es el ciberespacio? - El mundo - W. Gibson
  • Tengo sus anotaciones, estaban en su escritorio - Philip K. Dik
  • Esta formación constituye, en su totalidad, un desarrollo tridimensional de algún tipo de ecuación de orden superior - Stanislaw Lem
  • De nuevo la mezcla de rojo y verde, mirándole desde la naturaleza - Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Había un lugar en el Nostromo donde Dallas ocasionalmente encontraba algunos momentos de completa intimidad y al mismo tiempo se sentía razonablemente seguro. Era como una matriz artificial - Alan Dean Foster

#SAILFISHOS BY #JOLLA. Sailfish OS Verla introduces a new sharing system, camera updates, and more

Entrada escrita por: Fernando Lanero Barbero
#SAILFISHOS BY #JOLLA

(https://blog.jolla.com/verla/) Sailfish OS Verla introduces a new sharing system, camera updates, and more
Sep 16th 2021, 12:30

The summer is turning into autumn and it's again time for a new Sailfish release – the third one this year, having the version number 4.2.0 and bearing the name Verla. The name follows our scheme  of Unesco world heritage sites in Finland and (https://www.verla.fi/en/) Verla is a factory museum and its surrounding area, including an old groundwood mill founded at the end of the 19th century, a part of the history of  the paper industry in Finland.
As usual, the changes go all over, some easier to notice and some deeper in the software stack. Let's go now through some of the main items. More details can be found in the (https://forum.sailfishos.org/t/release-notes-verla-4-2-0/7092) release notes.
Sharing system redone
One of the more visible changes in this release is the new sharing system. In the earlier versions, the content sharing UI  was embedded into the applications that had content sharing capabilities. The UI itself was a common component, but it's use was not allowed by third party apps due to many sharing methods needing privileges either already restricted to the system UI side, or being something that we wanted to make more protected.
This has now been reworked and instead of embedding the sharing UI in the initiating app, we've implemented a system pop-up for handling the sharing method selection and the following details. By doing this we've been able to cut down on a lot of the permissions from our applications and thus made them more secure. For example, since sharing a note  from the Notes app by email no longer needs to embed an email composer in the app, there's no need anymore to allow it access to all the email and account related bits, etc.
This is also good news for third party developers. Without the need to access any privileged functionality we are finally now able to allow the sharing system for (https://github.com/sailfishos/sdk-harbour-rpmvalidator/pull/136) others to use too.
More changes you can see
On the App grid there's now something we call the Sticky App Grid. On tall devices like the new Xperias it can be difficult to reach the top of the screen in one-handed use. To make it easier to launch the top items, you can now drag the launcher grid upwards a bit and then just leave it there.
The calendar app main view is now slightly different. We changed the indicators in the month grid cells from simple rounded rectangles shown if there are events on the day to colored dots indicating which notebooks they are from. With this simple change the view becomes more useful, making it easier to spot what kind of events there are. Deeper in the same app it's also now possible to open contact cards for invitees.
(https://blog.jolla.com/content/uploads/2021/09/Verla_Screens_1.jpg)
 
The browser has continued very active development. In earlier releases we provided engine upgrades to the Gecko ESR60 level and now it's been polished further. On the feature side we've introduced the ability to configure the download folder and to edit login data. There have also been some adjustments to the page menu and the tab list.
In the old days a phone had one camera on the back and one in the front. Then more cameras started to appear, and maybe still some more. For us this became more topical with the Xperia 10 II and we've now added support for switching between the different zoom-level back cameras with buttons near the capture key.
Speaking of the camera, people taking a closer look at the changelogs might have noticed mentions of HDR and such. We've experimented a bit with the different exposure modes (e.g. sports mode and HDR), but as the different devices don't work consistently with them, and given some have problems with specific modes, we didn't yet make the UI for these visible. Maybe in some later release we'll get the hardware specific details sorted out enough to enable the setting.
And finally, specific to the Xperia 10 II, we've now made the virtual keyboard text prediction available. As you might remember, this was the first device where we shipped the operating system as a 64-bit version and due to the text prediction relying on an external prediction engine we weren't initially able to include the feature. We've now been able to bypass the problem by running the prediction side on a separate service for the keyboard.
(https://blog.jolla.com/content/uploads/2021/09/Verla_Screens_2_.jpg)
And some more sandboxing work under the hood
App sandboxing has been progressing since it was first shipped in February. We've been running the applications shipped with the operating system in sandboxes for a while now and with good results. There's been continuing improvements to the sandbox implementation and fixes to permission-related regressions.
For the community, we've noted that some developers have already tried out the new sandbox system, and for others the time for all 3rd party applications to be run in sandboxes is approaching. We will shortly publish detailed technical instructions in the forum and an overview blog post, so stay tuned.
And there are many more improvements besides; this is only a brief overview of the changes. There have been bug fixes, paper cut UI fixes here and there, and package upgrades. As always. The story will continue and the next upcoming release is already brewing.
The post (https://blog.jolla.com/verla/) Sailfish OS Verla introduces a new sharing system, camera updates, and more appeared first on (https://blog.jolla.com) Jolla Blog.

 

https://blog.jolla.com/verla/

Toda la información y las últimas novedades relativas al software libre y a Ubuntu las puedes encontrar en (http://linuxleon.org) linuxleon.org y (http://ubuntuleon.com) ubuntuleon.com.

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[HOW-TO] CONFIGURAR SUDO EN #SAILFISHOS AARCH64

Entrada escrita por: Fernando Lanero Barbero
A estas alturas todos sabemos que para ganar permisos de súper usuario en SailfishOS tenemos el comando:
devel-su

Pero en SailfishOS, al igual que en cualquier otro Linux del mundo mundial, se puede configurar "sudo" para ejecutar programas con los privilegios de seguridad de otro usuario (normalmente el usuario root) de manera segura, convirtiéndose así temporalmente en súper usuario. Y el tema no es tan trivial como parece, ya que esto nos permitirá tener un fichero "/etc/sudoers" en el que poder añadir usuarios como administradores, evitar que aplicaciones nos soliciten directamente permisos de administración, etc.


Para configurar "sudo" en SailfishOS basta con seguir estos pasos.

Instalar "sudo":

devel-su pkcon install sudo


Pero "sudo", aún correctamente instalado, no funciona "out-of-the-box". Para ello tenedremos que hacer a mayores:

devel-su pkcon install nano

Y añadir "defaultuser" como "sudoer" usando "nano":

devel-su nano /etc/sudoers

Y poniendo en la última fila del fichero:

defaultuser ALL=(ALL) ALL
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[ACTUALIZACIÓN] #ARCHLINUX. Sorting out old password hashes

Entrada escrita por: Fernando Lanero Barbero
[ACTUALIZACIÓN] #ARCHLINUX

The latest and greatest news from the Arch Linux distribution.

(https://archlinux.org/news/sorting-out-old-password-hashes/) Sorting out old password hashes
Jun 8th 2021, 08:32

Starting with libxcrypt 4.4.21, weak password hashes (such as MD5 and
SHA1) are no longer accepted for new passwords. Users that still have
their passwords stored with a weak hash will be asked to update their
password on their next login.
If the login just fails (for example from display manager) switch to a
virtual terminal (Ctrl-Alt-F2) and log in there once.

 

https://archlinux.org/news/sorting-out-old-password-hashes/

Toda la información y las últimas novedades relativas al software libre y a Ubuntu las puedes encontrar en (http://linuxleon.org) linuxleon.org y (http://ubuntuleon.com) ubuntuleon.com.

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#SAILFISHOS BY #JOLLA. Kvarken 4.1.0 brings full Sailfish 64-bit support to Sony Xperia 10 II

Entrada escrita por: Fernando Lanero Barbero
#SAILFISHOS BY #JOLLA

(https://blog.jolla.com/kvarken-xperia-10-ii/) Kvarken 4.1.0 brings full Sailfish 64-bit support to Sony Xperia 10 II
May 27th 2021, 08:08

We're happy to share with you the many firsts in this release: the 1st fully stacked 64-bit ARM Sailfish OS, that you can download and flash onto the Sony Xperia 10 II, which is also the first Sailfish device with AOSP-10 HW adaptation. The commercial Sailfish X package also introduces the 64-bit Android App Support for Xperia 10 II. The package is now available in the(https://shop.jolla.com)  Jolla Shop with a limited time offer of 29.90 € for existing Sailfish users (log in to see the discount).
(http://shop.jolla.com) Firstly we'll cover the new device and the 4.1.0 / Kvarken release highlights, then dive deep into the technical details of how the main milestones came to life.
tl;dr
Kvarken is the first update in the Sailfish 4 series with the above-mentioned 64-bitness and a new Sailfish X device. In another major feature improvement, Android App Support has been updated to the Android 10 API level.
Jolla Store has received many new goodies in Kvarken 4.1.0. Offline location data packages are now available from the Jolla Store, greatly improving the speed of location fixes. With Audio Recorder app you can record voice memos and other audio clips, and Open Forti VPN plugin lets you connect to Fortinet VPNs. Also, Aptoide Android store has been updated to run on the new Android 10 (API level 29).
(https://blog.jolla.com/content/uploads/2021/05/storagegoodies.jpg)
Other small, but handy features include desktop site mode and ability to install new search engines for Browser, and portrait support for the scientific mode in Calculator.
(https://blog.jolla.com/content/uploads/2021/05/featurehighlights.jpg)
On the quality front many calendar and contacts sync issues have been squashed, and random reboot issues troubling Xperia 10 have now been sorted out. Further, fixes have been made to get contacts for the 3rd party Signal app working again.
Read more details from the (https://forum.sailfishos.org/t/release-notes-kvarken-4-1-0/5942) release notes.
Released the Kvarken!
With 4.1.0, we have updated our naming theme for the upcoming Sailfish 4 software releases. We will introduce you to the amazing Unesco World Heritage sites of Finland! The first one, the unique (https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/898/) Kvarken Archipelago is Finland's only Natural World Heritage Site on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Together with Sweden's High Coast, the Kvarken Archipelago is the best place in the world to experience and understand the land uplift phenomenon caused by the last Ice Age. The 5,600 islands of the Kvarken Archipelago feature unusual ridged washboard moraines, 'De Geer moraines', formed by the melting of the continental ice sheet, 10,000 to 24,000 years ago.
(https://blog.jolla.com/content/uploads/2021/05/Sailfish-OS-Kvarken-web.jpeg)
Sony Xperia 10 II (Mark Two)
Xperia 10 II is a true gem of a device and shines like one due to its OLED screen. Black pixels are not emitting any illumination whatsoever, thus an absence of backlight gives supreme image depth to the viewer. This brings great reminiscence to the legendary Nokia N9 times, which also had an OLED screen.
Other improvements over its predecessor (Xperia 10) bring a bigger battery, which is also better managed by a newer kernel and the AOSP 10 board support package (and even longer battery life optimisations are in the pipeline). It now also has 4 GB of RAM by default (Xperia 10 single SIM had only 3 GB).
Mark Two has one additional ultrawide camera lens. Jolla Camera app support for multiple lenses is still under development, but community's (https://openrepos.net/content/piggz/advanced-camera) Advanced Camera app already supports all three.
Get Sailfish X for Xperia 10 II from the (https://shop.jolla.com) Jolla Shop.
Deep dive into the makings of the 64-bit Sailfish OS
Next we'll delve into the efforts that brought you Xperia 10 II running Sailfish OS on the 64-bit ARM architecture.
32-bit going on 64-bit
Community has been enquiring Jolla about going 64-bit since its early days. While we appreciated the push, there hasn't been a pressing case to do the switch, and we kept on supporting a nicely working 32+64-bit architecture sandwich throughout our devices, even after the new CPUs, SoCs, and the Android itself had turned 64-bit.
The benefits that a 64-bit Sailfish OS would bring are not immediately tangible: the quickest gain is being able to install and run 64-bit APKs via our Android App Support. Websites such as ApkPure started offering 64-bit APKs by default, and that introduced an extra burden to the users of 32-bit Sailfish OS. 64-bit however makes us future-proof, where we'll be able to address devices with larger RAM sizes, and support complex graphics (such as augmented reality and face ID). From the technical side, no longer being 32-bit eases our porting process to the 64-bit Android base, and automatically prevents issues that we otherwise had to work around in the past.
64-bit is no easy feat when your Linux stack is still 32-bit. And when the push came to shove, we turned our heads towards the Sailfish Core, which was the first to be converted. When we introduced our Intel-based device back in the day, we needed to bootstrap our OBS for the new Intel arch, make the necessary sb2 cross-compilers behave, and iron out dozens of RPM packages failing to build.
Achieving AArch64 (another name for ARM64) was (https://git.sailfishos.org/mer-core/ofono/merge_requests/272) no exception, and this time we too strived to align with the upstream RPM repositories (such as Fedora), cleaning up hacks and various custom patches, many of which were already accepted in their main projects and, most importantly, their latest versions would already have many if not all 64-bit issues resolved. This gave a nice opportunity to update quite a few of the core packages.
Once the aarch64 on OBS was all lit green, including the SDK, we took an internal device to pilot the 64-bit HW adaptation for it. The whole team jumped into fixing library paths e.g. ((https://github.com/mer-hybris/pulseaudio-modules-droid/pull/97) /usr/lib64) and associated issues, until even the hardware adaptation packages were happily churning away on the OBS on all architectures.
If a package builds, it still doesn't mean it'll do its job properly on the new architecture. Strangest of things from (https://github.com/libhybris/libhybris/pull/460) audio problems to browser crashes, all gotten ultimately resolved by our great teams and community.
Before too long, we had a working prototype to showcase the fully stacked 64-bit Sailfish OS, the Linux kernel, and the underlying Android HW adaptation:
(https://blog.jolla.com/content/uploads/2021/05/64-bit.jpeg)
Along came Sony Xperia 10 II and Android 10
We subsequently started to look into consumer devices running Android 10, a natural successor to Xperia 10 (which is based on AOSP 9 adaptation). We knew for certain to keep up with the times, trends, and technology, meaning this next Sailfish X device would have to be 100 % 64-bit ARM, running your favourite GNU/Linux-based mobile OS.

A quick clarification of what an underlying Android version adaptation (or base) means: Sony's Open Devices Program allows anyone to reflash a selection of phones with a plain Android Open Source Project (AOSP) build that you can compile yourself. AOSP follows the same version numbers as the official stock Android that comes when you buy a device. AOSP allows us to build Sailfish OS on top of the underlying bare minimum of Android HW adaptation. The important distinction (that often gets confused) is that our Android App Support version (or API level) is independent from the underlying AOSP base for any given device. So you can have your Xperia XA2 supporting Android 10 apps, whereas the HW layer of the device itself utilises Android 8 (=AOSP-8) Board Support Package.

Just like porting to any newer Android base, we've been confronted with many challenges never seen before. The first hurdle was getting the Android Linker Q (which still follows the alphabet notation) supported by libhybris. A wonderful person from the community played around with libhybris and contributed the first approach to the linker, which we then improved upon and (https://github.com/libhybris/libhybris/pull/467) completed the integration.
After the rest of (https://github.com/mer-hybris/) HW adaptation packages were happy with Android 10, we booted Xperia 10 II to the Sailfish OS UI (which is the equivalent of reaching the orbit). At this point, we were confident with merging the libhybris PR and published the first (https://sailfishos.org/wiki/Sailfish_X_Xperia_Android_10_Build_and_Flash) instructions so the community could start building and helping out too. Sailfish porters team Xperia 1 and XZ2 quickly jumped aboard, and we thank them for doing it together. Fun fact: one community member (who is now a sailor) started looking into Android 10 way before we did!
We were facing strange issues on Xperia 10 II with the touchscreen sometimes not reacting during the early encryption unlock screen. A surprise solution was to introduce a (https://github.com/sailfishos/yamuisplash/) Sailfish OS logo, which is shown beforehand because that initialises the HWC framebuffer, which in turn always ensures the touchscreen is responsive. What a reason to show a nice splash screen!
Another oddity was that the device played a tone across the increasing frequency range on every boot. The team has pinpointed it to the sound calibration routine and managed to reduce the noise to only the very first boot, whilst (https://github.com/sonyxperiadev/vendor-qcom-opensource-audio-hal-primary-hal/pull/22) collaborating with Sony's Open Device Program AOSP team. Fun fact: the first time I heard that sound, was during a video call with the team. This proves that porting a device can also happen whilst physically not having the device itself, and only using ssh tunnels when needed. Especially handy when remote work has been at its peak. Yet couple of months later, I too acquired a device and what a joy it was:
(https://blog.jolla.com/content/uploads/2021/05/x10ii.jpeg)
Some strangeness was haunting us in the audio routing department. Going from 9 to 10 (and 11), Android altered the way the wired headset paths travel, thus the team came up with a headphones workaround to fix many annoying issues, including but not limited to the delayed activation of accessories. It only goes to show, that porting new HW adaptations can be a truly hard problem!
Given the above challenges, I would like to mention that porting existing devices to the 64-bit world (and newer Androids) places us in the same position between a rock and a hard place as is updating the Xperia X (see the FAQ section at the bottom of the (https://shop.jolla.com) Jolla Shop page). Instead, we strive to bring new tech and devices to the scene (Android 10 | Xperia 10 II), as well as are considering how to support Sailfish OS community ports better in the future of Sailfish X program. We hope for your understanding on the matter.
With this, I wish everyone to enjoy the Xperia 10 II Sailfish OS 4.1.0 release, and happy hacking!
The post (https://blog.jolla.com/kvarken-xperia-10-ii/) Kvarken 4.1.0 brings full Sailfish 64-bit support to Sony Xperia 10 II appeared first on (https://blog.jolla.com) Jolla Blog.

 

https://blog.jolla.com/kvarken-xperia-10-ii/

Toda la información y las últimas novedades relativas al software libre y a Ubuntu las puedes encontrar en (http://linuxleon.org) linuxleon.org y (http://ubuntuleon.com) ubuntuleon.com.

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[ACTUALIZACIÓN] #ARCHLINUX. Move of official IRC channels to libera.chat

Entrada escrita por: Fernando Lanero Barbero
[ACTUALIZACIÓN] #ARCHLINUX

The latest and greatest news from the Arch Linux distribution.

(https://archlinux.org/news/move-of-official-irc-channels-to-liberachat/) Move of official IRC channels to libera.chat
May 24th 2021, 22:14

As some of you may have read over the past days, there has been an ownership dispute over the (https://freenode.net) freenode.net network. The IRC network has been used by Arch Linux and many other projects over the past decades as a platform for discussion and support.
The dispute led to the exodus of most former freenode staff from the network and the founding of a new network: (https://libera.chat) libera.chat
Starting today, Arch Linux and its sister projects (https://archlinuxarm.org) Arch Linux ARM and (https://archlinux32.org) Arch Linux 32 will begin migrating the official IRC channels from freenode.net to libera.chat. Please bear with us as this can take some time to be fully settled in.
We thank the freenode community for the many years of great service and collaboration.

 

https://archlinux.org/news/move-of-official-irc-channels-to-liberachat/

Toda la información y las últimas novedades relativas al software libre y a Ubuntu las puedes encontrar en (http://linuxleon.org) linuxleon.org y (http://ubuntuleon.com) ubuntuleon.com.

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